My Keezer/Kegerator Build

Original Freezer

I decided it was time to stop pouring my draft beer out of picnic taps in my chest freezer, and to finally build a keezer.  The picnic taps leaked into the freezer and when I put several kegs in at once, it was hard to tell which line went to which beer.  I timed the build (quite conveniently) when my dad came to visit me for the week.  It was a good decision, because he had great ideas from building the collar, to putting it on wheels.

Collar Base (2x4s)

Collar Base (2x4s)

We started with a plain white Frigidair freezer, and started by removing the top and measuring for the collar.  I know some make temporary builds in case they want to revert back to a freezer, but I opted to secure the collar to the freezer using liquid nails.  We used 2x4s cut to length, and screwed the 2×4’s together to make a rectangle.

Red Oak Collar

Red Oak Collar (pre-stain)

We used Red Oak for the face of the collar, and stained the oak a little darker because I wanted to paint the freezer black, and thought a darker colored oak would look nice against the black.  We clamped the oak to the 2x4s and used liquid nails to secure them together, but also used small finishing nails to help pull it tight.  It’s hard to see in the picture to the left, but the oak is raised a bit above the 2x4s for aesthetic reasons (the seal of the lid sits below the oak trim).

 

Rust-oleum

Rust-oleum

Spray Painting

Spray Painting

We painted the top of the freezer first since it was already detached.  We (and by we I mean my wife, Beth, who agreed to help with the project) removed the insulation and seal, and used Rustoleum appliance spray paint.  She then taped off the rest of the freezer and spray painted that.  The paint went on evenly, and within half an hour we were able to do a second coat.

Base with Casters

Base with Casters

photo 3Next was a base, also built out of 2x4s, which we put on casters to make it easy to roll the freezer around the house and onto the deck as well as raising the freezer up – which makes pouring home-brew much easier.  Just like the collar, we added the red oak trim to the outside of the 2x4s, and secured the base to the freezer with liquid nails.

From there, we stained the oak on both the collar and the base, and polyurethaned it (three times) to protect the wood.  I made sure to caulk the inside and outside of the collar seams to help with insulation, and drilled a small hole in the back of the collar so that I could run the temperature probe from the temperature regulator through it.

Perlick 525

Perlick 525

I used Perlick 525 forward seal faucets from Keg Connection (where I buy all my keg supplies) and 4 1/8 inch stainless steel shanks to go through both the 2x4s and oak.  Keg Connection also sells a Shank Beer Line Connection kit, with small items needed to connect your beer line to the shank.  I bought a 19 inch countertop drip tray on Amazon at a reasonable price – a necessity to install under the faucets.  I didn’t want to drill into the freezer walls to install the drip tray, so I used two-four inch L-brackets (painted black) to hold a piece of red oak (stained the same color as the collar/base), which I set the drip tray on.

Drip Tray Installation

Drip Tray Installation

I secured the L brackets to the keezer using epoxy, and attached the oak to the brackets using small screws.  I used velcro to attach the drip tray to the small shelf and to easily remove to clean.  I bought a four way air distributor, which I mounted to the collar in the back of the keezer, to distribute CO2 to each of the kegs (pictures to come).  I bought 10 foot beer hoses for each keg, which I installed to the shanks/faucets, since I had 5 foot picnic tap hoses and hear there are foaming issues with shorter lines (and the 10 foot lines work out great).  The 10 foot lines could quickly get out of control, so I organized them in the keezer using zip ties.

USB Fan

USB Fan

Bottle Opener

Bottle Opener

I’ve used a temperature regulator for years to ferment my beer, and started using it in the freezer to keep the temperature warm enough to not freeze the beer and serve it at the right temperature.  I mounted that to the back of the keezer using velcro so it’s hidden, but I can easily roll the keezer away from the wall to change temps if needed.  To help regulate temperature in the freezer (to avoid the bottom being cold and the top being warm), I bought a cheap USB fan, which I installed inside to circulate the air.  I also added both an Eva-Dry E-333 Wireless Dehumidifier (which you can ‘recharge’ by plugging in) and Damp Rid (from Home Depot) to help with condensation inside the freezer.

Since I sometimes bottle off kegs, I purchased a cast iron “Home Brew” wall mount bottle opener, and mounted that to the collar as well, and will probably install a bottle cap catch soon.

The build went well, and much quicker than I expected (because of my dad’s help – and my wife’s painting).  It is so much easier to have cold draft home-brew, and to keep things clean and  sorted with the keezer.  If you keg I would highly recommend the investment, and doing it right the first time. If you have any questions feel free to post below and if I can’t answer it, I’ll ask my dad!

BKBH Keezer / Kegerator Build

BKBH Keezer / Kegerator Build

 

 

 

 

10 Comments

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  1. Did you screw the collar to the freezer ?

    1. Dan – in retrospect I probably didn’t need to, but I did sink 2 screws in each side to pull the wood tight to the liquid nails.

  2. Hey nice build! I just bought a 5cu ft freezer I’m going to do the same thing to. You hit on all the things I was thinking of doing but one thing- did you router the edges on the red oak? Looks really good and I just bought a router table so figured I could get fancy with it

    1. Mick – I didn’t route the oak, instead I just added quarter round to the edges which gives it a finished look. I did not have my router with me at that time, but a routed board would look very nice!

  3. Great design. Simple and effective. I have been looking for a design for mine for a while and this is the best. How did you attach the drip tray and catch?

    1. Hi Joseph – sorry for the delayed response! I didn’t want to drill into the freezer (and accidentally hit a line), so I grabbed two L brackets from home depot, spray painted them black to match the freezer, and then used epoxy to attach them to the freezer. I used a small level to make sure they were even, and had to hold them in place for several minutes to ensure they didn’t slide down. Once those were ‘welded’ in place by the epoxy, I simply attached a stained piece of oak to the top of the L brackets with a screw, and then put velcro on the oak and drip tray so it would stay in place, but I could easily remove it to wash it out. I hope that helps!

  4. Great keezer build! I built a basic one about 4 years ago, but I have decided I want to build one that will hold more kegs and look like a piece of furniture. I really like what you did with yours! What size freezer chest did you start with? Also, did you add quarter round trim to the top of the oak piece?

    1. Eric – very sorry about the delay on this. I did stain a piece of quarter round and added to the top of the oak trim at the bottom (with some brad nails). Protects against hard edges and looks nice.

  5. What size casters did you use? I’m doing something almost identical and would like to know what will fit so I don’t have to carry my base into Harbor Freight and try it out physically.

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